Jowhor Ile

I first heard of Jowhor Ile when the orisa herself, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, mentioned his name in an interview and said we should look out for his debut novel. An endorsement from Adichie is not something to be taken lightly, so I immediately went on the hunt for the novel. It also made me very happy when I found out that the novel was set in Port Harcourt, which is one of my favorite cities ever. I finally caught up with Jowhor and we chatted over chilled beers. I found him very warm, eager, and completely without the airs typical of some writers. He agreedRead More →

First of all, I am a huge fan of Toni Kan. Have been right from his days at Hints, when I religiously read his column week after week. Hints magazine was my guilty pleasure and I would indulge in my favorite writers; Helon Habila, Toni Kan and even Chidinma Awa Agwu. I was very excited when The Carnivorous City by Toni Kan was published by Cassava press this year and I really looked forward to laying my hands on it. I previously purchased Nights of the creaking bed by the same author, but it has been sitting on my TBR shelf for a while. ToniRead More →

By Franklyne Ikediasor Crime fiction or conspiracy stories, if you like, is not a genre Nigerians write about a lot; this year, I think I have just come across just one of such books (Easy motion Tourist by Leye Adenle) so I was very excited to read A Conspiracy of Ravens by Othuke Omniabohs. I must say first of all, that this was a very refreshing work of fiction in a market crowded with immigration stories and poverty porn, and I was very happy to be read this book which tried to portray the very many issues bedevilling Nigeria and painted a picture of NigeriaRead More →

By Franklyne Ikediasor I first heard about Ms Okparanta’s novel earlier this year and the title, Under the Udala Trees, struck me, mostly because the Udala fruit is one of my favorite seasonal fruits and my home town gets its name from the same tree. So, it holds some sort of sentimental value for me. I then read the synopsis for the book and was blown away, so I desperately sought the novel until I found it online. I remember staying up all night to read the novel and when I finished I had to take a few hours to process all the various emotions IRead More →

By Franklyne Ikediasor In this debut novel Edify Yakusak establishes herself as a word artist, painting her story with a wide brush of vivid descriptions. The city of Jos comes alive on the pages of this book as she takes us through a tale of sorrow, pain, anguish, and despair. She chronicles the all too familiar story of ethnic tensions common in Nigeria which often boils over into full-scale conflicts. Edify throws her readers right into the plot, unmasking her characters for them to see, hear and touch. I was raised in Jos plateau state for a large part of my childhood, so this storyRead More →

By Franklyne Ikediasor Under the Udala Trees is a coming of age story like no other, one that shocks us, scares us, tugs at our heart strings and lifts the veil on a lot of the issues we pretend to forget. In this brilliant novel, Chinelo Okparanta manages to take on the horror of the Nigerian civil war and like Adichie in Half of a yellow Sun, she focuses on people whose lives were changed by the war rather than on the war itself. It’s a story of a shy young girl coming into her own, a story of humans becoming unfeeling to death andRead More →