yemisi aribisala

Nigerian food belongs to the Nigerian… It is not gastronomically illustrious, not yet given its due…it is also a multifaceted┬ácultural treasure trove full of intriguing stories… Aribisala writes about Nigerian ingredients and soups in the way one would a lover, a person whose tricks, tastes, and curves are as known and dear as one’s own body. She showcases the dynamic, larger-than-life personality of Nigerian food and seats it on its own throne among food royalty. In each essay, every recipe or pot of soup she talks about, she describes every detail so exquisitely that as you read, you can taste the crunchy, bursting seeds ofRead More →

dancing the death drill

Jean-Jacques Henri, an Algerian waiter at a restaurant in Paris, has committed murder. His story however, does not begin at the point of murder; It goes far back to South Africa, where he is known as Pitso Motaung, a mixed-race, hot-tempered young man who volunteered to join the war because he had something to prove. Pitso’s journey, although not nearly as interesting to me as that of the Mendi and the peoples/cultures of SA, is the frame through which the events unfold. Many of Khumalo’s characters are well-developed and consistent, even though I found some of them unnecessary, or maybe just allotted more lines ofRead More →

david nicholls

Douglas Petersen is a fairly happy man, or at least content – with a decent living as a scientist, an artist wife to whom he has been married for more than 20 years, and a son who is just about to start college – until she (the wife) wakes him up in the middle of one night to tell him she thinks she wants to leave him. Douglas is surprised to say the least, but he is determined to win his wife back. He has planned a summer tour of Europe for his little family, booked hotels, printed an itinerary. The only things he isRead More →

First of all, I am a huge fan of Toni Kan. Have been right from his days at Hints, when I religiously read his column week after week. Hints magazine was my guilty pleasure and I would indulge in my favorite writers; Helon Habila, Toni Kan and even Chidinma Awa Agwu. I was very excited when The Carnivorous City by Toni Kan was published by Cassava press this year and I really looked forward to laying my hands on it. I previously purchased Nights of the creaking bed by the same author, but it has been sitting on my TBR shelf for a while. ToniRead More →

  “It’s strange and ultimately insulting how, when someone you love dies, just expires without warning, time does not stop.” Melody “Mel” Vaught and Sharon Kay Kisses couldn’t be any more different. Mel is the chain-smoking, binge-drinking, insanely talented life of the party, while Sharon is reserved, insecure, and often unlucky in love. They bonded over passion and art and forged a friendship and partnership that spanned over a decade. Mel and Sharon are animators; they create adult cartoons. They endure years of doubt and obscurity, but soon their career begins to take off. As they start to settle into the ride to fame, tragedyRead More →

Teju Cole is master of his crafts. His extensive knowledge, deep understanding, and detailed explanation of them are startling. In this collection of essays, Cole discusses topics ranging from literature to photography to art, music, travel, the Black Lives Matter movement, world politics, social media, Boko Haram, mob lynchings, and so much more. Reading this book felt like fine dining, or like a journey around the world. The places he takes you may be breathtaking or unexpectedly ramshackle, but rest assured that the view is worth the journey. The end result will be a sound education of the mind and an awakening (poking and proddingRead More →

By Franklyne Ikediasor Crime fiction or conspiracy stories, if you like, is not a genre Nigerians write about a lot; this year, I think I have just come across just one of such books (Easy motion Tourist by Leye Adenle) so I was very excited to read A Conspiracy of Ravens by Othuke Omniabohs. I must say first of all, that this was a very refreshing work of fiction in a market crowded with immigration stories and poverty porn, and I was very happy to be read this book which tried to portray the very many issues bedevilling Nigeria and painted a picture of NigeriaRead More →

By Franklyne Ikediasor In this debut novel Edify Yakusak establishes herself as a word artist, painting her story with a wide brush of vivid descriptions. The city of Jos comes alive on the pages of this book as she takes us through a tale of sorrow, pain, anguish, and despair. She chronicles the all too familiar story of ethnic tensions common in Nigeria which often boils over into full-scale conflicts. Edify throws her readers right into the plot, unmasking her characters for them to see, hear and touch. I was raised in Jos plateau state for a large part of my childhood, so this storyRead More →

Blurb Against all odds, Mileva Maric arrived at the Polytechnic in Zurich, determined to make something of herself in the male-dominated world of physics. She almost succeeded too, dazzling her colleagues with her unusual brilliance and winning the respect of the erstwhile disdainful Professor Weber. Then she fell in love.Read More →

Efunsetan Aniwura is a wealthy, childless chieftain in Ibadan, where Latoosa is the Aare. She has lands and slaves to till them until their backs are sore. An especially wicked woman, she beats her slaves black and blue for the smallest missteps and beheads them at will, especially if they dare to get pregnant.Read More →